Thursday, January 25, 2007

Baby Heroin


I was working at a prison in Alabama last week. Its hard for the inmates to obtain traditional drugs of abuse (marijuana, cocaine, heroin), so the inmates try to get high on prescribed medications. Controlled substances such as Ativan and Xanax are usually not prescribed in the prison; but the inmates can be quite creative and try to get high off of medications that are not traditionally considered addictive/abuseable. The antipsychotic Seroquel seems to be quite popular these days, and prisoners are calling it "baby heroin." In this prison, it is given to prisoners crushed so they can not trade it or sell it to other inmates. One prisoner, until she was caught and taken off of Seroquel, was in the habit of spitting the Seroquel tablets into her coffee and then selling the coffee.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I find this very interesting. Worked at prisons once [can't say I wont do it again]. Indeed, can never underestimate the creativity of substance abusers. How else do they fashion euphoric substances? Do you know of a resource where to look and find out what other prescribed substances [at least in prison] are morphed into substances of abuse? Thanks.

: Joseph j7uy5 said...

I did some moonlighting in a prison a while back. The thing everyone wanted there was Elavil. It was not to get high; it was to get to sleep. For many people, it is hard to sleep in prison. I suspect that is why Seroquel has gotten popular.

Anonymous said...

There are many medications that are abused in the prisons that are not abused on the outside. Ditropan (oxybutynin) is a drug of abuse. So are meds such as clonidine, benadryl, ergotamine/caffeine, gabapentin, and many more. Many meds, such as trazodone, are used for their sedative properties. Sleep aids in prison are not a good idea and definitely a security risk. Just think what could happen to you if you are knocked out. It is called non-consensual relations.

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